Briya CDA Student Paulette

Briya CDA student changes lives at childcare home

Paulette Sansbury, a student in Briya’s Child Development Associate program and a participant in Mary’s Center, is a shining example of how dedication and care can make a difference in people’s lives.

Sansbury cares for infants and toddlers at God Is So Good Child Development Home, which she opened five years ago.

“Showing children love is very important,” Sansbury said. “If children feel secure and loved, then they won’t have a problem with learning.”

Eager to increase her child care knowledge, Sansbury applied to be part of DC’s Early Learning Quality Improvement Network (QIN). Her home was selected and she began working with Mary’s Center, which serves as a training and support center for providers in the QIN. As part of the QIN, Sansbury participates in one-on-one mentoring and monthly trainings, and is enrolled in Briya’s Child Development Associate program.

“Paulette has truly opened herself up to learning new information,” said Yael Kiken, Child Care Licensing Program Coordinator at Mary’s Center. “She approaches the learning process with eagerness and joy that translates to high-quality care in her child development home.”

“It’s rewarding, the things I’m learning,” Sansbury said. “You have to let the child show you what they’re interested in. Doing that, you peek into who they are. Once they guide you, you follow their lead.”

Sansbury’s care and generosity have a big impact on the families she serves. Two of the children who recently began attending Sansbury’s home are 22-month-old twins. Their mother, Kidste Mekonnen, had lost her restaurant business because she didn’t have childcare.

Sansbury worked with Mary’s Center staff to help Mekonnen apply for the childcare subsidy that enabled her children to go to Sansbury’s home.

Because she now has childcare, Mekonnen is able to attend Briya’s Family Literacy program, where she learns English, digital literacy skills and parenting in the Advanced II class. She hopes to get her high school diploma and get a job again.

“I’m so happy,” Mekonnen said. “I see my life’s changed already. I was two years in the house, alone with my kids, no going out. I was very depressed. And I came here and I have a lot of friends and I love class so much.”

Mekonnen feels confident and secure leaving her children in Sansbury’s care while she studies.

“I feel like they are at home,” she said. “She’s like a mom.”

Pre-K Tree Study 2016

PreK students become tree experts

The 20 PreK students at our Ontario Road site just finished up 10 weeks of studying trees.

To begin, the children observed the parts of trees—roots, trunk, branches, leaves, and fruit—and learned the purpose of each part. They planted seeds and guessed if they would grow better in the sun or out of the sun. This experiment helped them realize that trees start as seeds and need sun and water to grow.

The students also learned about the variety of resources trees provide—fruit like apples, oranges, and bananas; wood that can be used for items like furniture and instruments; and more. Students explored some of these resources by making homemade paper, baking apple pies, and doing other hands-on activities.

In addition, children learned how to care for trees and about tree “doctors” called arborists. The classes even took a field trip to the National Arboretum to explore trees and plants there.
“We began studying trees in the fall because it’s such a beautiful time to observe how trees change,” said Emily Gordon, a PreK instructor. “We like to connect our studies to the students’ lives. We talked about trees they see out of their apartment windows, trees they see on the way to school, trees they see in our school neighborhood, etc.”

Student learning about treesStudying one topic for an extended period of time allows children to dig deep into the topic rather than just touch the surface of many topics. Throughout the study, teachers reviewed what students were taught in previous weeks to reinforce their learning.

At the end of the 10 weeks, parents were invited into the classroom for a celebration. Students happily shared what they had learned and created, and everyone enjoyed a delicious fruit salad made from the students’ favorite fruits—that grew on trees, of course!